8 Ways to Make Your Photographer’s Job Easier

Simplifying the job isn’t about the photographer. It’s about you, your spouse-to-be, and your photos. A photographer that doesn’t have to deal with unexpected issues can spend more time focusing on the couple and ensure a beautiful end product. (Not to mention, it makes your day much less stressful.)

Here are a few ways to ensure your wedding photography goes smoothly:

  1. Provide a detailed shot list. Hate the jumping pose? Note it. Want a first look with your father? Write it down. The more details you give your photographer the better the results.
  2. Discuss your wedding day schedule. Your photographer will be able to provide expert advice and point out if your time allotments are off.
  3. Relay important rules from venues and vendors. Some churches won’t allow photographers past a certain point in the sanctuary. Communicating that ahead of time ensures your photographer has the proper lenses or equipment.
  4. Disclose any strained relationships. If, for instance, your mom and stepmom can’t stand to be near each other, let your photographer know. This will prevent the unwanted drama of being incidentally placed next to each other in a photo.
  5. Put someone in charge of grouping people. Photos will be more efficient if someone outside of the wedding party is there to help. They will be able to point out who’s who or run and grab people if needed.
  6. Keep libations to a minimum. Photographers understand: It’s a big day and you want to celebrate. But moderation is key. Stumbling bridesmaids or rowdy groomsman make it harder for the photographer to capture the photos and quality you expect.
  7. Ask guests to limit personal photos. Guests trying to snap a photo can get in the way of your paid photographer. Many couples will simply leave a polite note in their wedding program.
  8. Point out VIPs. If you’d like your extended family members or other close friends to be in the candid photos you’ll have to point them out or make note ahead of time.
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